On the distinction of difference and similarity

There are differences and similarities.

Differences, however, come in two kinds: difference in a similarity (like different kinds of legs) and pure difference (like legs and livers). It means that no thing can be different in both kinds of differences at the same time.

Similarities appear to come in just one kind, but are instead relative: an A may be similar to B:s, and a B may be similar to A:s.  It means that one thing may be judged as a B and similar to A:s at the same time as this thing is judged as a B and similar to A:s.

These properties mean that “difference” and “similarity” are separated by one orthogonal level, and thus that one thing on one level thus may be judged as both an A and a B on the similarity level (ie, the relative level), at the same time as it can’t be judged as both an A and a B on the difference level, and thus that this thing may be judged as both and not both an A and a B at the same time.

This is a  contradiction that conceptualization offers by its fundamental structure,, but which can’t be real.  Reality is instead that which is hidden beyond this contradiction. And, the difference between reality and the contradiction is that whereas our classification of reality is contradictory, reality itself is not contradictory, but just ambiguous, since contradiction is inconsistent, but reality isn’t.

Reality is thus the consistent system that lurks behind our inconsistent conceptualization of it. It is the similarity between difference and similarity that we lose by distinguishing them.

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